Corrective Jaw surgery

Based on various genetic and developmental factors, your upper and lower jawbones may not develop normally. Depending on the exact malformation you have, subsequent functional issues can arise including insufficient tongue space, airway issues (which can lead to sleep-related breathing disorders), biting/chewing issues, speech issues, TMJ issues, and even issues with psychosocial happiness.

Introduction to Corrective Jaw Surgery

Discrepancies can affect your upper jaw (maxilla), and/or your lower jaw (mandible). As a fellow-ship trained Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon who specializes in the augmentation of the maxillofacial skeleton, there are many different surgical techniques that Dr. Coppelson can utilize to give you the best final outcome.

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Optimal Results and Patient Satisfaction

Dr. Coppelson utilizes the most state-of-the-art virtual surgical planning and patient-specific custom 3D printed titanium hardware on all of his cases. This is to ensure the most precise, esthetically pleasing, and symmetric results possible. He also utilizes the most cutting-edge instruments in the operating room that cut down on operating room time and reduce many of the notorious risks associated with jaw surgery. The result is a postoperative course with less swelling, less pain, less bleeding, and less chance of permanent injury to sensory nerves in the face.

What is Maxillomandibular Advancement (MMA) Surgery?

The size and shape of the jaws have a big impact on the size of the airway. MMA surgery is a type of corrective jaw surgery that is targeted at patients with sleep-related breathing disorders like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). MMA can improve all airway levels, from the nasal cavity to the hypopharynx, and has around a 90% success rate as reported in the literature. As the most effective surgical intervention in the treatment of OSA, many patients are able to get rid of other cumbersome and irritating appliances like a CPAP.

How is the Surgery Performed on the Upper Jaw?

The surgery most often performed on the upper jaw (also known as the maxilla) is called a LeFort 1 Osteotomy. The surgery is completely done through incisions inside the mouth so there will never be any scars on your skin. Once the maxilla is seperated from the surrouinding bones, its position and orientation can be precisely corrected to get you the most favorable functional and esthetic result. 

How is the Surgery Performed on the Lower Jaw?

The surgery most often performed on the lower jaw (also known as the mandible) is called a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). However, depending on your exact condition, Dr. Coppelson may recommend a different surgery that would give you a better result. The surgery is completely done through incisions inside the mouth so there will never be any scars on your skin. Once the distal (tooth-bearing) segment is mobilized, its position and orientation can be precisely corrected to get you the most favorable functional and esthetic result. 

Will I Also Need Surgery on My Chin?

After both jaws are fixated in their final position, you may benefit from an additional procedure on the chin that could provide more balance to the face, more projection of the chin, and/or provide further improvements to your airway. Depending on the design of the bone cuts and the reasons we perform them, the procedure is called a genioplasty or genioglossus advancement. The surgery is performed at the same time as the corrective jaw surgery and also performed through incision placed completely in the mouth.